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In conjunction with the Christian Dior exhibition

From left to right: Patricia Saputo wearing the Dolores dress, Pascale Bourbeau wearing the Bella dress and Bita Cattelan wearing the Arthénice dress. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020

Dior, From Sketches to Dresses: Made by Helmer Joseph

Discover Bella, Dolores and Arthénice, three Dior evening dresses made by Montreal fashion designer Helmer Joseph in keeping with the haute couture tradition, using original House of Dior patterns. This project in conjunction with the exhibition Christian Dior is the perfect opportunity not only to bring to the forefront a highly specialized skill set, but also to show the ingenuity that shaped the golden age of haute couture!

This project was made possible thanks to the generous support of Pascale Bourbeau, Bita Cattelan and Patricia Saputo.

  • From left to right: Patricia Saputo wearing the Dolores dress, Pascale Bourbeau wearing the Bella dress and Bita Cattelan wearing the Arthénice dress. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Bita Cattelan wearing the Arthénice dress, 1959, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Bita Cattelan wearing the Arthénice dress, 1959, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Patricia Saputo wearing the Dolores dress, 1961, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Patricia Saputo wearing the Dolores dress, 1961, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Pascale Bourbeau wearing the Bella dress, 1959, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020
  • Pascale Bourbeau wearing the Bella dress, 1959, Maison Christian Dior. Made by Helmer Joseph commissioned by the McCord Museum. © Sergio Veranes Studio, 2020

Follow Helmer Joseph behind the scenes for an insider’s view of making haute couture, and learn more about the creation process from the toile to the finish garment.

If you missed the beginning of this original project,
you can learn more at: An Insider’s View of Haute Couture

A Word From the Donors

I am honoured to be involved in this unique project and to present a dress that will inspire many, House of Dior’s Bella dress.

“I have designed flower women,” said Christian Dior. Indeed, he longed to imitate the delicate curves of blooming petals in the design of his dresses.

The iconic style of the famous French couturier is here recreated by the skilled Québec couturier Helmer Joseph marrying the talents, the expertise, and the know-how of two eras.

— Pascale Bourbeau

To quote Christian Dior:
“Even in extravagance, fashion must make sense.”

And I would add:
“Balance your extravagance with a gesture that makes sense.”

It has been a privilege to participate in the Dior Project,
supporting the custodian of Montreal’s social and cultural history, the McCord Museum.

— Bita Cattelan

If DIOR stands for:
D — Do what you love!
I — Invest with heart!
O — Own based on passion!
R — Reward yourself and others!

Then I would say:
With heart and passion,
And for the love of fashion,
I rewarded myself, no less,
Then with a DIOR dress!

The McCord Museum’s social history mandate
Needs funds to help continue its fate,
The dual reward of self and Montreal,
Helps benefit one and all!

— Patricia Saputo

Visit the exhibition Christian Dior at the McCord Museum from September 25, 2020 to January 3, 2021.

With the generous collaboration of

École supérieure de mode | ESG UQAM
Sergio Veranes Studio
Textiles Couture Elle

Photographer: Sergio Veranes

After studying at Brown University and taking photography courses at Rhode Island School of Design, Sergio Veranes starts his photographic career in 1996 working with several major fashion magazines, and shooting advertising campaigns in France and  Italy.

Now a Montrealer, Sergio Veranes gears his work towards the production of authentic, incisive portraits and explores the expression of bodies in movement, working with dancers and athletes. He masters light and contrast with a dedicated sculpting touch, producing images of dramatic depth and beauty.

Between 2017 and 2019, he becomes actively involved in the creation of two projects: “Souls of Montreal”—an incisive study of Montrealers through a large compilation of portraits celebrating human diversity, and “Anima”—an artistic work on the body in movement featuring dancers and circus artists. These projects will see the light of day in 2020-2021.

Sergio Veranes Studio: sergioveranesstudio.com | Facebook | Instagram

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